Boeing's Dreamliner jet is being scrutinized by journalists and critics. A new report from the New York Times is revealing that workers at the Boeing plant in South Carolina are reportedly being pressured to speed up production at all costs. What's more, employee concerns regarding safety risks and potential defects are allegedly being ignored by the airplane manufacturer.

Investigators at the New York Times interviewed more than a dozen company insiders, looked at company emails and studied hundreds of pages of documents before concluding that Boeing is a company that values speed over quality when it comes to production. This is news that should worry anyone who plans to step foot on an airplane again.

This isn't the first time Boeing has been put in the hot seat. Boeing employees have filed safety complaints with the federal government in the past. Some of the allegations from workers include poor manufacturing practices and pressure from managers to keep quiet over regulatory violations. It is also being alleged that Boeing workers have installed faulty parts when assembling aircraft. These allegations are more than troubling. Boeing has continuously denied any accusations regarding manufacturing problems with its Dreamliner in the past.

Allegations regarding the manufacturing process behind the Dreamliner come while Boeing is in the middle of dealing with issues surrounding its 737 MAX aircraft. The model was grounded by airlines around the world following the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines flight this spring. In addition, a federal criminal probe is now being conducted regarding the certification process for the 737 MAX.

Scott Dylan is a contributing writer at GET.com and has been to (almost) every country in North, Central and South America with nothing more than a backpack, a laptop and the desire to explore. He speaks Spanish fluently and has logged enough time in planes, trains, rideshares, buses, taxis and rickshaws to know how to rack up rewards and points to get anywhere his heart desires for pennies on the dollar. Email: scott.dylan@get.com.